What Does "Appeal" Mean?

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Appeals are not uncommon in our legal system, and many of us have a sense of what the word means. Of course, if you’re thinking about filing a claim, it’s important for your legal knowledge to be as well-formed as possible. In light of that, here’s a more detailed explanation of what an appeal is.

Definition of "Appeal"

Most people have a sense of what an appeal is-- it’s essentially something that one party can file if an unsatisfactory ruling was made. But not just any unsatisfactory ruling will apply-- the party filing the appeal has to show that the ruling was made on an incorrect reading of the law.

Sometimes, depending on the case type, the appeal might be reviewed by a governing agency and then go to an appellate court rather than simply going directly to an appellate court. For example, if a government agency makes a ruling and the appellant files an appeal, that case might be reviewed by a group within the agency that serves as a governing body.

Appeals and Your FDCPA Claim

If all goes well, you won’t need to appeal your FDCPA claim; if all goes well, you’ll get your desired ruling the first time. But if the judge doesn’t rule in your favor, you could get an attorney to examine your case and see if an appeal would be advisable. At that point, ideally with the help of an attorney, you can file an appeal to see if you can show that the way the law was read in your case was incorrect.

Additional Resources:

Do I need to appeal in court?
What materials are needed to file a claim?