Phone Script for When McCarthy Burgess & Wolff Calls*

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You are concerned about a couple of outstanding credit card accounts. The concern morphs into panic, when a representative from McCarthy Burgess & Wolff calls you at home.

Stress from dealing with outstanding consumer debt turns into acute anxiety because you do not know how to handle a phone call made by a third party debt collector.

The good news is you do not have to interact with McCarthy Burgess & Wolff at all. Moreover, a licensed consumer protection lawyer can coach you on what to say to a debt collection agency over the phone.

A federal law passed in 1977 cemented your rights as a consumer to fight back against third party debt collectors.

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) prohibits debt collection agencies such as McCarthy Burgess & Wolff from harassing you by phone or through the United States mail system.

Third party debt collectors are not allowed to deceive consumers into paying off credit accounts and personal loans.

The FDCPA also establishes guidelines for taking unethical debt collection agencies to court for violating one of more provisions of the federal law.

Should You Share Information with McCarthy Burgess & Wolff?

When you receive a phone call from a debt collection agency, the representative on the other end of the line will read from a script that follows a logical sequence of questions.

The debt collection specialist will know exactly what to say because of thorough training and years of experience collecting consumer debts.

By working with a licensed FDCPA lawyer, you gain the confidence to know how to respond, if you decide to respond to any of the questions posed by a representative from McCarthy Burgess & Wolff.

Under the FDCPA, you can request a third party debt collector stop contacting you by phone and mail. If a verbal request goes unnoticed, you have the legal right to send a cease and desist letter preferably crafted by your lawyer.

Phone Script for When McCarthy Burgess & Wolff Calls*

What to Do When speaking with a Third Party Debt Collector

An experienced FDCPA lawyer will create a script to counteract the tried and true script read from by a debt collection agency representative.

One of the most cited tactics used by debt collection agencies is trying to collect delinquent credit accounts that consumers are not under any legal obligation to pay.

After you establish the identification of the debt collector, you then explain that you will turn on a tape recorder, which gives you evidence of the entire conversation.

One of the most important questions comes next:“Are you collecting on behalf of a creditor, your employer or yourself?”

Do not answer any other questions over the phone until the debt collection agency representative answers the question.

If the debt you owe is relatively new, the third party debt collector is most likely working for the original creditor. However, most debt collection agencies buy outstanding debts for pennies on the dollar.

When you receive a telephone call from a McCarthy Burgess & Wolff representative, you are up against an accomplished professional who knows how to get consumers to pay delinquent credit accounts and personal loans.

Speak with a licensed consumer protection lawyer today to ensure you benefit from the legal rights granted by the FDCPA.

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*Disclaimer: The content of this article serves only to provide information and should not be constructed as legal advice. If you file a claim against McCarthy Burgess & Wolff or any other third-party collection agency, you may not be entitled to any compensation.